Canon law in medieval England
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Canon law in medieval England a study of William Lyndwood"s Provinciale with particular reference to testamentary law by Brian Edwin Ferme

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Published by LAS in Roma .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • England

Subjects:

  • Lyndwood, William, 1375?-1446.,
  • Constitutiones provinciales ecclesiae Anglicanae.,
  • Wills -- England -- History.,
  • Wills (Canon law) -- History.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [153]-164).

StatementBrian Edwin Ferme.
SeriesStudia et textus historiae iuris canonici ;, 8, Studia et textus historiae juris canonici ;, 8.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKD1509 .F47 1996
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 164 p. ;
Number of Pages164
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL436256M
ISBN 108821303292
LC Control Number98145554
OCLC/WorldCa37889247

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL ROMAN CANON LAW IN ENGLAND In discussing the influence of the Canon law in England, the period of time open for our investigation is those cen-turies between the Norman Conquest and the Reformation, or from the middle of the i ith to the middle of the i6th century. After the break with Rome by Henry VIII all. The book is a catalogue of manuscripts of both chronological and systematic collections of canon law produced for ecclesiastical use. For each collection, Kéry lists (1) the author (where known), (2) date of creation, (3) place, (4) type, (5) printed editions, (6) manuscripts, and (7) bibliography. The Medieval Coroner (Cambridge Studies in English Legal History) The office of coroner was established in England in ; it has had an unbroken history, and has been exported to many countries, including the United States. (Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Canon Law) by Manlio Bellomo Paperback $ Only 2 left in stock - order Cited by: Under the direction of Tribonian, the Corpus Iurus Civilis was issued in three parts, in Latin, at the order of the Emperor Justinian. The Codex Justinianus () compiled all of the extant (in Justinian's time) imperial constitutiones from the time of Hadrian. It used both the Codex Theodosianus and private collections such as the Codex Gregorianus and Codex Hermogenianus.

It intersects with every aspect of medieval life and society, and at one point or another, every medievalist works on the law. In this book, Kriston Rennie looks at the early medieval origins and development of canon law though a social history framework, with a view to making sense of a rich and complex legal system and culture, and an equally 5/5(1). Quality and consistency are the outstanding characteristics of the work of Michael Sheehan. From his publication of The Will in Medieval England in through ‘The Bequest of Land in England in the High Middle Ages: Testaments and the Law’ in he built steadily and persistently on the foundations of the work that had gone before. It is meant as an immense tribute to say that Michael. Genre/Form: Church history History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Duggan, Charles. Canon law in medieval England. London: Variorum, Mar. Shelves: canon-law, dissertation, history, intellectual-history, medieval This, intermittently, is a very fun and interesting book. Canon law has the distinct feature of being either hugely interesting or hugely boring, with startlingly little middle ground, and this book follows this pattern pretty well/5.

Canon law, body of laws made within certain Christian churches by lawful ecclesiastical authority for the government both of the whole church and parts thereof and of the behavior and actions of individuals. In a wider sense the term includes precepts of divine law incorporated into the canonical codes. the authority of the "Roman canon law" in medieval England? The best known statement of Stubbs' position on this question may be found in the Report of the Ecclesiastical Courts Commis­ sioners, published in 7. The text of the Report, subscribed to if not written by Stubbs, states that "the canon law of Rome, thoughCited by: Books shelved as canon-law: Code of Canon Law: A Text and Commentary by The Catholic Church, New Commentary on the Code of Canon Law (Study Edition) by J. Evangelical Protestants on the Continent typically cast off a good deal more of the heritage of medieval canon law than did their Anglican brethren in England. Despite fierce disagreements in post-Reformation Europe and the Americas over the role of religious law in Christian life, numerous elements of the medieval canonistic tradition remain.